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How WI lawmakers voted to avoid default

Wisconsin's lawmakers are reacting to the passage of this legislation, enacted during a forced truce, to keep the country from going into default

WISCONSIN (WFRV) Wisconsin's lawmakers are reacting to the passage of this legislation, enacted during a forced truce, to keep the country from going into default. For the lawmakers we reached out to, all agreed it was time to find a way to avoid a possible national default. And when it came time to vote - it appears many stuck to their guns.          

In the Senate, this bill passed 81-18 by having won the support of most Democrats and many Republicans concerned about the economic impact a default would bring to the stock market. Democratic Senator Tammy Baldwin voted for it - Republican Senator Ron Johnson voted no

"If we were to default, economists across the political spectrum have said it would be catastrophic to the global economy and to our economy," said Sen. Baldwin. "We think the government shutdown hurts, defaulting on our debts would be many, many times worse."

"Democrats are happy to increase the debt burden on our kids and grandkids; they are happy to continue spending money; they are happy not to address out long-term debt and deficit issues," said Sen. Johnson. "They want to keep their heads in the sand and pretend this issue goes away."

In the Republican controlled House, Speaker John Boehner provided the votes needed to win passage of the legislation. Tea Party House Republicans had initially demanded defunding the affordable care act to provide essential federal funding. The bill to avoid default and reopen government passed 285 - 144.

Republican Representative Tom Petri stuck to his principals and voted against the measure. Petri released a statement saying, "If history is any indication, I'd say we'll be facing these same issues again next year.  At some point we have to face reality and come up with real solutions to our spending problems."      

As of Wednesday evening, we don't know how Rep. Reid Ribble voted or his reaction. 

But this solution is only temporary. While it reopens government, it only funds it until January 15. In addition, while if avoids default, it only gives the U.S. Treasury authority to continue borrowing to pay bills until February 7.

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