Near Record High Number of Beach Closings in 2010

Near Record High Number of Beach Closings in 2010

America’s beaches saw the second-highest number of closing and advisory days in more than two decades last year largely because of dirty, polluted water.

June 29, 2011 -- Last year, America’s beaches had the second-highest number of closings and advisory days in more than two decades. Dirty, polluted water was the main culprit.

In 2010, U.S. beaches were closed for 24,091 days, up 29% from 2009, according to the 21st annual beach water quality report, which was released by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), an environmental action group headquartered in New York City.

The increase is mainly the result of heavy rainfall in Hawaii, contamination from unidentified sources in California, and oil washing up from the Gulf oil spill. Seventy percent of the closings resulted from too-high levels of bacteria from human or animal waste that finds its way into oceans in large part because of storm water runoff and sewage overflow. The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that more than 10 trillion gallons of untreated storm water makes its way to surface water each year.

“This year’s report confirms that our nation’s beach water continues to suffer from serious contamination,” David Beckman, director of the water program at the NRDC, said during a teleconference.

Beach water pollution poses health risks including stomach flu, skin rashes, and pinkeye; and ear, nose, and throat problems. Overall, the Great Lakes region had the most frequently contaminated beach water in 2010, and the Southeast, New York-New Jersey coast, and Delmarva region had the cleanest beach water, the new report showed. Individual states with the highest rates of reported contamination in were Louisiana, Ohio, and Indiana. States with the lowest rates of contamination last year were New Hampshire, New Jersey, Oregon, Hawaii, and Delaware. The NRDC based their report on government data on beach water at more than 3,000 beaches nationwide, and also gave ratings to 200 popular public beaches based on their water quality.

Common Sense Advice for Beach Days

Beach goers can also do their share to make sure a day at the beach is nothing short of a day at the beach, said NRDC senior water attorney Jon Devine.

“A day at the beach doesn’t have to mean getting sick,” he says. “Don’t swim near or in front of storm drains and don’t swim within 72 hours of heavy rain,” Devine says.

And always make sure you check for closures or advisory notices before you hit the beach, he says. "If the water looks or smells funny, don’t go in,” he says.

“Picking up your garbage, not feeding birds or other wildlife, cleaning up after your pets, and directing water runoff from your house to soil, not the street also helps,” he says.

On a national level, green infrastructure -- which involves the use of techniques that allow rainwater to infiltrate the soil, instead of flowing to storm drains that carry it to nearby water bodies -- is part of the safer beach water solution. Congress is mulling over a Green Infrastructure for Clean Water Act.

Gulf Oil Spill Update: Some Cleanup Progress Made

This year’s report includes a special section dedicated to oil-related beach closures and advisories in the Gulf of Mexico region since the oil spill last year. “Two states -- Florida and Louisiana -- still have closure or advisory notices posted into 2011,” Devine said.

“In terms of overall figures, this was a big deal and it affected nearly 9,500 beach days around the Gulf in the last two years, but the oil spill is affecting fewer beaches now than last year.”

Beach Award Winners and Losers

The new report awarded “Superstar Beach” status to four U.S. beaches:

  • Rehoboth Beach-Rehoboth Avenue Beach, in Sussex County, Dela.
  • Dewey Beach, in Sussex County, Dela.
  • Park Point Lafayette Community Club Beach, in St. Louis County, Minn.
  • Hampton Beach State Park in Rockingham County, N.H.

These awards are issued because winning beaches test their water more than once a week, notify the public promptly when tests reveal bacteria levels exceeding health standards, and post closings and advisories online and at the beach.

The report also listed the top 10 “Repeat Offender” beaches with persistently poor water quality year after year.

These repeat offenders include:                               

California: Avalon Beach in Los Angeles County (3 of 5 monitored sections):

  • Avalon Beach - Near Busy B Café
  •  Avalon Beach - North of GP Pier
  • Avalon Beach - South of GP Pier

California: Cabrillo Beach Station in Los Angeles County

California: Doheny State Beach in Orange County

  •  Doheny State Beach - North of San Juan Creek
  •  Doheny State Beach - Surf Zone at Outfall

Florida: Keaton Beach in Taylor County

Illinois: North Point Marina North Beach in Lake County

New Jersey: Beachwood Beach West in Ocean Couny

Ohio: Villa Angela State Park in Cuyahoga County

Texas: Ropes Park in Nueces County

Wisconsin: Eichelman beach in Kenosha County

Wisconsin: South Shore Beach in Milwaukee

Curious how your favorite beach rates? Visit www.nrdc.org/water/oceans/ttw/200beaches.asp.

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