Dillon's Law would broaden access to epinephrine

MISHICOT, Wis. (WFRV) - A Mishicot family is lending their support to a bill named after their son which is aimed at saving lives. Local 5's Kris Schuller reports Dillon's Law would allow trained individuals to administer epinephrine to anyone having a severe allergic reaction.

Three years ago 18-year-old Dillon Mueller was stung by a bee, went into anaphylactic shock and died a week later. It is a tragedy his parents won't ever forget.

“He did not know what was happening and within 10 minutes he was unconscious,” said Angel Mueller, Dillon’s mother. “He would still be alive today had there been an EpiPen available.”

Since then a law was passed allowing trained businesses and organizations to have and administer these EpiPens in an emergency. Like here at Fox Hills Resort.

“Somewhere, somebody is going to be allergic and will need to have this service,” said Roberta Eichelberg.

But that law excluded trained individuals and State Representative André Jaque (R-De Pere) is determined to change that.

“This legislation is really modeled after some of the existing expansion of access to epinephrine we’ve done in the legislature over the past couple sessions,” said Jacque.

Jacque is pushing a bill called Dillon's Law, which would allow anyone trained on how to use an epinephrine auto-injector to purchase and administer the life-saving drug.

“They basically would have Good Samaritan protections,” Jacque said.

Since Dillon's death his parents have been advocates for legislation making epinephrine available to anyone.

“Had EpiPens been available to the public someone would have had one with them and that would have saved his life,” said Mrs. Mueller. 

The couple prays the bill passes in Madison. Because EpiPens save lives and no family should lose a loved one to an easily treated allergic reaction.

“Don't want anybody to go through what we went through -  seeing that happen to somebody you love,” said George Mueller, Dillon’s father.

Representative Jacque is one of the lead sponsors of the bill. Anaphylaxis results in 1,500 deaths each year in the U.S.

 


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