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Flooding concerns in Oshkosh

In Oshkosh, flooding has been a big problem. Last spring streets and homes were overwhelmed with unwanted water, and the city has taken steps to alleviate the flooding. Channel 5's Donald Robinson has details.
OSHKOSH, Wis. (WFRV) -- In Oshkosh, flooding has been a big problem. Last spring streets and homes were overwhelmed with unwanted water, and the city has taken steps to alleviate the flooding. "The back door was raised about five feet off the ground and there are eight feet poured foundation walls," said Jennifer Liska. Liska knows what its like to be flooded out. It happened to her in 2008 and again last June. Liska was in the beginning stages of getting minor repairs on her home last summer when things went south. "I had another four feet of water in my basement and by June 30th the minor things turned into a whole construction project," she said. About $30,000 for the remodel came from project recovery. Now things are much better, but its not perfect. "Where the original sump pump is there is still a little water through the floor," Liska said. "And there is a spot at the bottom of the steps where the new foundation meets the old." Sump pumps on the east side of Oshkosh were getting a work out too. This area flooded a lot last year. However, the city installed a new storm sewer system recently. "We also built the pump station over in that area to handle storm water flow specially," said James Rabe, Oshkosh Public Works Department. The city has between 270 to 280 miles of streets. But, it can only reconstruct about four to four and a half miles of streets each year. "With the local projects and all the work that the DOT is doing, Main Street was being worked on last year and there is all the work out by Highway 41 that is still on going and the city is still doing a lot of work locally," said Rabe. One way the city says you can help slow the flooding or avoid it all together is by keeping grass out the sewer system. Some of the storm sewer systems in Oshkosh date back to the 1920s. Donald Robinson reports.
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