Warren Gerds Extra! Who’s afraid of the big bad wolf?

Warren Gerds Extra! Who’s afraid of the big bad wolf?

You may be, if it’s feeding time.
Wolves at Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary (Warren Gerds)
Wolves at Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary (Warren Gerds)
Deer carcass for wolves at Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary (Warren Gerds)
Deer carcass for wolves at Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary (Warren Gerds)
Wolves eating at Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary (Warren Gerds)
Wolves eating at Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary (Warren Gerds)
Wolves at Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary (Warren Gerds)
Wolves at Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary (Warren Gerds)
Wolf at Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary (Warren Gerds)
Wolf at Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary (Warren Gerds)

PHOTO: The eyes have it with this wolf at Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary. Warren Gerds photo

GREEN BAY, Wis., (WFRV) – “I’ll huff and I’ll puff and I’ll blow your house down.”

“The wolf at the door.”

“Don’t wolf down your food.”

“Who’s afraid of the big bad wolf?”

The wolf has gotten a bad rap through time.

Today, “wolf predation” in Wisconsin is blamed for nasty things happening to everything from hunting dogs to cattle.

Like ’em, hate ’em or fear ’em, let your curiosity take hold some time and see the five new wolves at Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary in Green Bay near Bay Beach Amusement Park.

A good time to catch the wolves is at 1:30 p.m. Monday, Wednesday or Friday. That’s when a deer carcass is hauled out for them to wolf down (of course).

On the day I saw the feeding, all five wolves were first lounging in an open space in the sun. Two seemed mildly interested in the human visitors. The other three just slept, oblivious to the world.

About 1:20, one of the wolves got up. Soon, it was leading an entourage. Everybody headed toward a fenced area on the west side of their outdoor quarters.

The first thought was, “They can tell time.”

Well, more likely, they heard the sounds of a keeper setting up for their ritual that will end with a dead deer magically appearing in their territory.

Um um.

First, the wolves milled.

Then they walked into a cage.

The keeper shut them in, then opened another gate. Out he came pulling a wagon with the torso of a deer.

He placed the carcass in front of the viewing area, waved to the watchers, shut one gate and opened another. Out trotted the five.

The wolves inspected the meat. The three light wolves settled in to eat peaceably. The two darker ones drifted back to play and “chat” a bit with the keeper.

The dark ones wandered past the viewing window. One nosed up close to the window and peered at a small girl who on this day may well have been Little Pink Ridinghood.

Um um.

Look at its eyes in the picture at the top.

Is the wolf not saying, “Um um”?

Being behind thick plate glass, I was not afraid of the wolf, bad or not.

However, out in the wild up north, when wolves howl, I pay attention.

So does my dog, who knows her name in wolf-talk is, “Lunch.”

You may email me at warren.gerds@wearegreenbay.com. Watch for my on-air features on WFRV at 6:45 p.m. Thursdays and every other Sunday between 6 and 8 a.m. (usually around 7:45 a.m.)

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