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NWTC Students Go Face First Into Pies For Pi Day

GREEN BAY, Wis. - NWTC students who are members of the technical college's science club held a pie-eating contest on Pi Day to raise money for their organization, which promotes careers in STEM. 

Pi is an infinite number that helps measure the circumference of a circle. It starts off as 3.14 and continues on forever.

Pi Day is on March 14th every year, which is 3-14 on our calendars.

It may not be significant to a lot of us, unless you're someone who loves math and science like the members of NWTC's Science Club. 

"Science is everywhere," NWTC student Stephanie Darschewski said. "I mean a glass of water is science, plants are science, it's all around us. I mean, we're science. And there's so much we don't understand which is extremely intriguing to me."

So, the science club members went face-first into lemon meringue pies to raise money for their organization. 

"I'm glad it's not coconut cream pie, that's what we had last year, hate coconut," Darschewski added. 

The three students and one NWTC instructor who competed took on a pretty interesting strategy, flipping the pies over with their  teeth and eating it straight off the table. 

"It was pretty nonconvential I would say," NWTC student Jonathan Little said. 

The pie-eating contest almost ended in a tie, with the professor and a student having their leftover crumbs compared to determine the winner. 

The student edged out the professor, and took home the championship belt. 

The money raised through raffle tickets sold helped the NWTC Science Club expand their knowledge in the STEM field. 

"Last year we went to the museum in Milwaukee, that was pretty cool," Darschewski said.

"The Science Club volunteers all over the place, around Green Bay, we've done the Einstein project before, we've done career days at schools, and then we take some fun field trips down to science museums," NWTC instructor Angelo Kolokithas said. 

Which in turn, helps those pursuing careers in STEM learn more about its real-world potential. 

"There's so many jobs that are currently in the STEM field, and they're only increasing in the size in America," Little said. 

The NWTC Science Club is usually able to raise a few hundred dollars from selling raffle tickets on Pi Day. 


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