State senate approves bills including allowing kids to run lemonade stands, making bestiality a felony, more

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MADISON, Wis. (WFRV) — The State Senate met today in Madison and approved a number of bills, including one making bestiality a felony and another allowing kids to run lemonade stands.

Bill making bestiality a felony

According to the Associated Press, the Senate approved Senate Bill 139, introduced by Senator Andre Jacque (R-De Pere), which makes bestiality a felony. There was no debate by the Senate on this bill.

Having sex with an animal is currently considered a misdemeanor. Under this bill, those convicted could face up to 12 1/2 years in prison and would have to register as sex offenders.

Children legally allowed to operate lemonade stand

The Senate also approved a bill allowing children in the state to legally operate a lemonade stand.

The Associated Press reports anyone under the age of 18 would be permitted to operate a lemonade stand on private property without a permit.

Under the law, these kids would not be able to sell more than $2,000 of lemonade per year, equivalent to 8,000 cups at 25 cents each. The law does prohibit the sale of foods that may be hazardous, including raw meat and eggs.

This bill now goes to the state Assembly.

State’s hemp industry boosted

On Tuesday, the Senate also approved a bill that would keep Wisconsin’s hemp industry under state control.

According to AP, the bill, which passed 30-2, “the bipartisan measure is designed to help farmers, hemp processors, retailers and consumers as the industry in Wisconsin explodes.”

This bill will also move on to the Assembly.

Five of Gov. Evers’ cabinet secretaries approved

Five of Governor Evers’ Cabinet secretaries were also approved Tuesday.

AP reports those confirmed were:

  • Revenue Secretary Peter Barca, a former Democratic state Assembly member and congressman
  • Financial Institutions Secretary Kathy Blumenfeld
  • Administration Secretary Joel Brennan
  • Corrections Secretary Kevin Carr
  • Veterans Affairs Secretary Mary Kolar

Eleven other secretaries selected by Gov. Evers have yet to be confirmed, but continue to work in their agencies unless the Senate votes to reject them.

To read more about these secretaries, click here.

Bills combating Lyme disease

A package of bills passed in the Senate Tuesday are intended to combat Lyme disease in the state.

As the number of Lyme disease cases in Wisconsin remains a concern – with the amount of cases in the state doubling in over a decade – the bills will require the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources to post Lyme disease warnings on state land.

The DNR would also be required to sell insects repellent at state parks and forests as well as include information on the disease in brochures and run campaigns annually to warn the public about Lyme disease.

Bill approving insurance for immediate survivors of police, emergency medical workers

Wisconsin senators approved a bill making the state, municipalities, and universities to continue paying health insurance premiums for immediate survivors of police officers and emergency medical workers killed in the line of duty.

This coverage would last until the spouse of the victim turns 65 and children turn 26. The bill passed, 33-0.

Two bills establishing protocols for handling sexual assault kits

Two bills aimed at establishing protocols for handling sexual assault evidence kits were approved Tuesday.

One bill states that if a victim wants to report an assault to law enforcement, nurses need to notify officers within 24 hours of collecting the rape kit. The other bill would require the state Justice Department to track kits.

Other bills passed include:

  • Bill 433 designating a portion of Highway 28 near Kewaskum as the Wisconsin 9/11 Memorial Highway
  • A bill changing how rechargeable electric motors would be regulated
  • A bill requiring builders to purchase wetland mitigation credits within the watershed they are working in

The Associated Press contributed to this story.

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